Chat with us, powered by LiveChat POOR GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE II - Essayabode

 This assignment is a part 2 of a previous one completed. I have uploaded my assignment PART 1completed, the assignment was reviewed by my instructor and she add some comments that must be added or fixed for this PART 2. THE BLUE BOX must be double click to read what she wrote there to update.

 I need update that according to her comment and wide a little more SECTION 4 AND SECTION 5. 

ALSO I NEED TO WIDE MY REFERENCES it is required at least 20 scholarly resources, NO OLDER THAN 5 YEARS AND CHECK THAT PROFESSOR AS WELL REQUIRE APPENDIX.

1

MSN Project Manuscript Section I-III

POOR GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE II

Executive Summary

Purpose

2

To ascertain the efficacy of a community-based diabetes self-management education

program for people with type II diabetes among geriatric adults in rural Miami, Florida, in a way

that improves glycemic control, reduces complications, expends fewer health resources, and

enhances quality of life for one year.

Project Location

This program was conducted in rural community centers in Miami because they are

easily accessible to the elderly and are suitable for educational activities.

Synthesis of Literature and Evidence

Literature reviews have indicated that diabetes self-management education can

significantly improve health outcomes among the elderly due to the enhancement of their ability

to handle the disease by themselves. This informed the adoption of the program, which was

tailored to the needs of a rural elderly population.

Implementation

The program was conducted in three phases: preparation, implementation, and

evaluation. It provided educational workshops on important self-care topics and individualized

support through biweekly follow-ups and coaching.

Dissemination

The project's findings will be published in scientific journals, highlighted at conferences,

presented at community meetings, and disseminated on a website that aims to influence public

health policy and foster the creation of such programs in other rural settings.

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION AND PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION

3

Diabetes Mellitus Type II is, therefore, a severe public health problem, especially when it

comes to the elderly. Aging increases susceptibility to complications of the condition, which may

be compounded further by co-morbidities. Such is the case in rural Miami, Florida, where

healthcare resources remain less than optimal, among other things. The following paper

highlights how effective community-based diabetes self-management education was for seniors

over 65 with type 2 diabetes regarding glycemic control, health care utilization, and quality of

life.

Problem Statement

Diabetic elderly patients in rural Miami have numerous challenges in type 2 diabetes

management, whereby poor glycemic control is common, and complications are on the rise. Poor

glycemic control is common, and complications are on the rise. The traditional approach to

health is limited by accessibility, tailored education, and patient engagement; as such, this study

will propose an organized intervention to cater to these inadequacies in care and improve the

health status of this frail population.

Problem Background

Diabetes management in the elderly is comprehensive and involves standard medical

treatment. Therefore, these educational interventions, emphasizing self-management, could be

used with this population. However, there is a lack of targeted programs in rural Miami that

address the unique needs and challenges faced by the elderly diabetic population.

Stakeholders

The program's stakeholders would include the geriatric population with type 2 diabetes,

healthcare professionals working in rural Miami, local health departments, community centers

4

where the programs could be conducted, and elderly caregivers. It would also interest

policymakers who seek to reduce the cost of health care connected with diabetes.

PICOT Question

In adults aged 65 and above with type 2 diabetes in a rural community in Miami, Florida

(P), implementing a community-based diabetes self-management education program (I)

compared to standard care (C) results in improved glycemic control, reduced diabetes-related

complications, decreased healthcare utilization, and enhanced quality of life (O) over 12 months

(T)?

SECTION 2: LITERATURE SUPPORT

Review of Literature

A comprehensive review of existing literature and evidence highlighted the benefits of

diabetes self-management education programs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that such

programs can significantly improve glycemic control, reduce the incidence of diabetes-related

complications, and enhance participants' overall quality of life. For instance, a study by Trento et

al. (2021) found that diabetes self-management education is associated with clinically significant

improvements in glycemic control. The Davidson et al. (2022) study also emphasized the long-

term benefits of self-management education, noting reductions in HbA1c levels, improved self-

efficacy, and better diabetes-related knowledge among participants.

In another study, Van Truong et al. (2021) found that older adults participating in self-

management programs reported better adherence to medication, improved dietary habits, and

increased physical activity levels. Section II: Intervention Description

SECTION III: INTERVENTION DESCRIPTION

5

Proposed Intervention

This organized program for community-based education includes regular health

monitoring, individualized coaching sessions, and biweekly seminars led by community health

professionals. The program aims to raise awareness of diabetes management techniques, promote

lifestyle modifications, and enhance medication compliance.

Setting

The program will take place in community centers across rural Miami, Florida, where

most elderly residents have limited access to health facilities.

Barriers

Possible barriers will be the need to attend sessions, resistance to change after habituation

to long-standing behaviors, and limited access to technology for remote consultations. Strategies

to overcome them will be transport services, education in collaboration with family members,

and easy and accessible technology use.

Outcomes

The expected outcomes include improved HbA1c levels, a decrease in the frequency of

ER visits, and a decline in the quantity of diabetes-related hospital admissions. Other expected

outcomes are in the form of self-reported measures relating to the patient's quality of life.

Outcome measures in this study will be derived from pre- and post-intervention surveys, medical

records, and continuous glucose monitoring systems.

Action Plan

The action plan includes specifics on how participants will be recruited, training for the

educators, the development of educational material, workshop schedules, and follow-up

6

appointments. The baseline for critical milestones is the initial enrollment of participants, the

mid-point evaluation, and the end-of-study assessment.

SECTION IV: JOHN HOPKINS NURSING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE MODEL

Introduction to Model

Using the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Model in this paper becomes

pivotal in directing the practicum project to improve glycemic control in the elderly diabetic

population living in rural Miami. It is an elaborate 19-step model grouped under three primary

phases: practice question, evidence, and translation (PET). The model is designed to identify

issues stepwise and systematically, acquire and appraise relevant evidence, and layout

practicable and sustainable strategies.

Applying the model to the project, the practice question phase entails formulating a

specific question to solve poor glycemic control. In the evidence phase, a systematic literature

review and data collection are conducted to confirm the necessity of the project, which is a

community-based diabetes self-management education program, and to gauge the effectiveness

of similar interventions conducted in studies by Trento et al. (2021) and Davidson et al. (2022).

SECTION VI: TRANSLATION TO PRACTICE AND EVALUATION

Evaluation

Intervention effectiveness will be measured by comparing pre-and post-intervention data.

Dissemination

7

The findings will be shared with the broader community through public meetings,

professional health forums, and publication in peer-reviewed medical journals to inform policy

and practice further.

Conclusion and Contribution to the Nursing Profession

This result is expected to provide valuable insight into community-based educational

interventions for managing type 2 diabetes among the elderly. Therefore, the study should be

applicable across a wide implementation based on the proven effectiveness of community-based

educational interventions and, consequently, prove useful in diabetes management strategies in

response to the needs of the elderly in similar rural settings.

References

8

Davidson, P., Dickinson, J. K., Hyer, S., LaManna, J., Davis, J., Ojeda, M. M., & Kavookjian, J.

(2022). A comprehensive analysis of randomized controlled trials examined for people

with type 1 diabetes. 48(2), 111–135, The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and

Care.

Mastrian, K., and D. McGonigle (2024). Nursing informatics and the knowledge base. Learning

by Jones & Bartlett.

.

Tsai, P. S., Van Truong, P., Lin, M. Y., Chiu, H. Y., & Wulan Apriliyasari, R. (2021). Effects of

self-management programs on medication adherence, blood pressure, self-efficacy, and

body mass index in older individuals with hypertension: a meta-analysis of randomized

controlled trials. 27(2) of the International Journal of Nursing Practice, e12920.

Salassa, M., Barutta, F., Gruden, G., Trento, M., Fornengo, P., Amione, C., & Porta, M. (2020).

Education on self-management has the potential to lower blood pressure in type 2

diabetics. a controlled, randomized clinical experiment. 30(11), 1973–1979; Nutrition,

Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases.

,

1

MSN Project Manuscript Section I-III

Student’s name: Lourdes Cano

Chamberlain University

Advanced Nursing Role Synthesis

Date: May 15, 2024

POOR GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE II

Executive Summary

MECHY ABAD
98440000000001168
Where is your literature matrix from 528? It should be in the appendix

2

Purpose

To ascertain the efficacy of a community-based diabetes self-management education

program for people with type II diabetes among geriatric adults in rural Miami, Florida, in a way

that improves glycemic control, reduces complications, expends fewer health resources, and

enhances quality of life for one year.

Project Location

This program was conducted in rural community centers in Miami because they are

easily accessible to the elderly and are suitable for educational activities.

Synthesis of Literature and Evidence

Literature reviews have indicated that diabetes self-management education can

significantly improve health outcomes among the elderly due to the enhancement of their ability

to handle the disease by themselves. This informed the adoption of the program, which was

tailored to the needs of a rural elderly population.

Implementation

The program was conducted in three phases: preparation, implementation, and

evaluation. It provided educational workshops on important self-care topics and individualized

support through biweekly follow-ups and coaching.

Dissemination

The project's findings will be published in scientific journals, highlighted at conferences,

presented at community meetings, and disseminated on a website that aims to influence public

health policy and foster the creation of such programs in other rural settings.

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION AND PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION

3

Diabetes Mellitus Type II is, therefore, a severe public health problem, especially when it

comes to the elderly. Aging increases susceptibility to complications of the condition, which may

be compounded further by co-morbidities. Such is the case in rural Miami, Florida, where

healthcare resources remain less than optimal, among other things. The following paper

highlights how effective community-based diabetes self-management education was for seniors

over 65 with type 2 diabetes regarding glycemic control, health care utilization, and quality of

life.

Problem Statement

Diabetic elderly patients in rural Miami have numerous challenges in type 2 diabetes

management, whereby poor glycemic control is common, and complications are on the rise. Poor

glycemic control is common, and complications are on the rise. The traditional approach to

health is limited by accessibility, tailored education, and patient engagement; as such, this study

will propose an organized intervention to cater to these inadequacies in care and improve the

health status of this frail population.

Problem Background

Diabetes management in the elderly is comprehensive and involves standard medical

treatment. Therefore, these educational interventions, emphasizing self-management, could be

used with this population. However, there is a lack of targeted programs in rural Miami that

address the unique needs and challenges faced by the elderly diabetic population.

Stakeholders

The program's stakeholders would include the geriatric population with type 2 diabetes,

healthcare professionals working in rural Miami, local health departments, community centers

4

where the programs could be conducted, and elderly caregivers. It would also interest

policymakers who seek to reduce the cost of health care connected with diabetes.

PICOT Question

In adults aged 65 and above with type 2 diabetes in a rural community in Miami, Florida

(P), implementing a community-based diabetes self-management education program (I)

compared to standard care (C) results in improved glycemic control, reduced diabetes-related

complications, decreased healthcare utilization, and enhanced quality of life (O) over 12 months

(T)?

SECTION 2: LITERATURE SUPPORT

Review of Literature

A comprehensive review of existing literature and evidence highlighted the benefits of

diabetes self-management education programs. Numerous studies have demonstrated that such

programs can significantly improve glycemic control, reduce the incidence of diabetes-related

complications, and enhance participants' overall quality of life. For instance, a study by Trento et

al. (2021) found that diabetes self-management education is associated with clinically significant

improvements in glycemic control. The Davidson et al. (2022) study also emphasized the long-

term benefits of self-management education, noting reductions in HbA1c levels, improved self-

efficacy, and better diabetes-related knowledge among participants.

In another study, Van Truong et al. (2021) found that older adults participating in self-

management programs reported better adherence to medication, improved dietary habits, and

increased physical activity levels. Section II: Intervention Description

SECTION III: INTERVENTION DESCRIPTION

Proposed Intervention

Charlene Romer
98440000000001168
would insurance companies be stakeholders also?

5

This organized program for community-based education includes regular health

monitoring, individualized coaching sessions, and biweekly seminars led by community health

professionals. The program aims to raise awareness of diabetes management techniques, promote

lifestyle modifications, and enhance medication compliance.

Setting

The program will take place in community centers across rural Miami, Florida, where

most elderly residents have limited access to health facilities.

Barriers

Possible barriers will be the need to attend sessions, resistance to change after habituation

to long-standing behaviors, and limited access to technology for remote consultations. Strategies

to overcome them will be transport services, education in collaboration with family members,

and easy and accessible technology use.

Outcomes

The expected outcomes include improved HbA1c levels, a decrease in the frequency of

ER visits, and a decline in the quantity of diabetes-related hospital admissions. Other expected

outcomes are in the form of self-reported measures relating to the patient's quality of life.

Outcome measures in this study will be derived from pre- and post-intervention surveys, medical

records, and continuous glucose monitoring systems.

Action Plan

The action plan includes specifics on how participants will be recruited, training for the

educators, the development of educational material, workshop schedules, and follow-up

appointments. The baseline for critical milestones is the initial enrollment of participants, the

mid-point evaluation, and the end-of-study assessment.

6

SECTION IV: JOHN HOPKINS NURSING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE MODEL

Introduction to Model

Using the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Model in this paper becomes

pivotal in directing the practicum project to improve glycemic control in the elderly diabetic

population living in rural Miami. It is an elaborate 19-step model grouped under three primary

phases: practice question, evidence, and translation (PET). The model is designed to identify

issues stepwise and systematically, acquire and appraise relevant evidence, and layout

practicable and sustainable strategies.

Applying the model to the project, the practice question phase entails formulating a

specific question to solve poor glycemic control. In the evidence phase, a systematic literature

review and data collection are conducted to confirm the necessity of the project, which is a

community-based diabetes self-management education program, and to gauge the effectiveness

of similar interventions conducted in studies by Trento et al. (2021) and Davidson et al. (2022).

SECTION VI: TRANSLATION TO PRACTICE AND EVALUATION

Evaluation

Intervention effectiveness will be measured by comparing pre-and post-intervention data.

Dissemination

The findings will be shared with the broader community through public meetings,

professional health forums, and publication in peer-reviewed medical journals to inform policy

and practice further.

Conclusion and Contribution to the Nursing Profession

Charlene Romer
98440000000001168
where is the John Hopkins tool?

7

This result is expected to provide valuable insight into community-based educational

interventions for managing type 2 diabetes among the elderly. Therefore, the study should be

applicable across a wide implementation based on the proven effectiveness of community-based

educational interventions and, consequently, prove useful in diabetes management strategies in

response to the needs of the elderly in similar rural settings.

References

Davidson, P., Dickinson, J. K., Hyer, S., LaManna, J., Davis, J., Ojeda, M. M., & Kavookjian, J.

(2022). A comprehensive analysis of randomized controlled trials examined for people

with type 1 diabetes. 48(2), 111–135, The Science of Diabetes Self-Management and

Care.

8

Mastrian, K., and D. McGonigle (2024). Nursing informatics and the knowledge base. Learning

by Jones & Bartlett.

.

Tsai, P. S., Van Truong, P., Lin, M. Y., Chiu, H. Y., & Wulan Apriliyasari, R. (2021). Effects of

self-management programs on medication adherence, blood pressure, self-efficacy, and

body mass index in older individuals with hypertension: a meta-analysis of randomized

controlled trials. 27(2) of the International Journal of Nursing Practice, e12920.

Salassa, M., Barutta, F., Gruden, G., Trento, M., Fornengo, P., Amione, C., & Porta, M. (2020).

Education on self-management has the potential to lower blood pressure in type 2

diabetics. a controlled, randomized clinical experiment. 30(11), 1973–1979; Nutrition,

Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases.