Chat with us, powered by LiveChat Overview This is the first. Stepping Stone Lab One is an opportunity to consider how to incorporate object-oriented principles to solve a problem in a manner that users can readil - Essayabode

Overview

This is the first. Stepping Stone Lab One is an opportunity to consider how to incorporate object-oriented principles to solve a problem in a manner that users can readily engage.

In this lab, you will write pseudocode for the final project scenario program. Pseudocode is a description of how a program will be structured and will operate. It allows a programmer to “think in words” about the design of a program before composing code, and it is also useful for project teams in deciding on basic structures and design.

Prompt

Address the following in your submission:

A. Analyze the problem your program will solve. This analysis will inform your code logic as you consider how to solve the problem.

B. Break the problem down into distinct steps of pseudocode that will solve the problem.

C. Create variables to track the various elements in the pseudocode; use control structures such as branching or looping.

D. Use natural language to work through the problems.

Refer to the How to Write Pseudocode document for guidance.

What to Submit

This assignment should be submitted as a Microsoft Word document with 12-point Times New Roman font and one-inch margins.

Scenario

You will create a program that will help you manage a collection of recipes.

You will implement three classes: one for the main recipe items, one for the ingredients that are part of the recipe, and one for the entire collection of recipes.

The collection should use a list data structure to store the individual items. Your collection class should include methods like addItem(), printItem(), and deleteItem() that allow you to add, print, or delete items from your collection of items.

Your Ingredient class will model the items that will be stored in each recipe in your collection. You will give it some basic attributes (of numeric or string types) and some basic methods (accessors/mutators, printItemDetails(), etc.).

Your Recipe class will start off similar to your Ingredient class, but you will increase its functionality by modifying it to accept the Ingredient objects, containing all the details stored in an Ingredient class object. You will also expand the Recipe class by adding recipe-specific methods to your Recipe class.

The basic, foundational elements are shown in the following Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagram for the required classes:

Pseudocode for a Collection Manager Program

Overview

Your work on the final project for this course is supported by a series of stepping stone labs. This is the first. Stepping Stone Lab One is an opportunity to consider how to incorporate object-oriented principles to solve a problem in a manner that users can readily engage.

In this lab, you will write pseudocode for the final project scenario program. Pseudocode is a description of how a program will be structured and will operate. It allows a programmer to “think in words” about the design of a program before composing code, and it is also useful for project teams in deciding on basic structures and design.

Prompt

You have been tasked with developing a complete, modular, object-oriented program that will allow for the management of a collection. The scenario provided to you outlines all of the program’s requirements. Refer to the provided scenario to make the determinations for all data types, algorithms and control structures, methods, and classes used in your program.

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Pseudocode for a Collection Manager Program

Overview

Your work on the final project for this course is supported by a series of stepping stone labs. This is the first. Stepping Stone Lab One is an opportunity to consider how to incorporate object-oriented principles to solve a problem in a manner that users can readily engage.

In this lab, you will write pseudocode for the final project scenario program. Pseudocode is a description of how a program will be structured and will operate. It allows a programmer to “think in words” about the design of a program before composing code, and it is also useful for project teams in deciding on basic structures and design.

Prompt

Address the following in your submission:

A. Analyze the problem your program will solve. This analysis will inform your code logic as you consider how to solve the problem.

B. Break the problem down into distinct steps of pseudocode that will solve the problem.

C. Create variables to track the various elements in the pseudocode; use control structures such as branching or looping.

D. Use natural language to work through the problems.

Refer to the How to Write Pseudocode document for guidance.

What to Submit

This assignment should be submitted as a Microsoft Word document with 12-point Times New Roman font and one-inch margins.

Stepping Stone Lab One Rubric

Criteria

Proficient (100%)

Need Improvement (70%)

Not Evident (0%)

Value

Assignments

All variables are assigned with logical names and represent relevant values

Variables are present but do not clearly represent the relevant values

Variables are not assigned

10

Code Logic

Pseudocode clearly illustrates all of the program’s primary functionality and logic and is self-explanatory

Pseudocode illustrates all or most of the program’s primary functionality and logic, but pseudocode is not self-explanatory, has inconsistencies with the program’s functionality, or contains significant errors or gaps in detail

Pseudocode does not illustrate the program’s primary functionality and logic

30

Decisions or Flow Control Using Branches

Proper decision functionality is clearly defined and correctly applied using a branching structure

Decision functionality is present but is not clearly defined or is applied incorrectly

Decision functionality is not present

20

Iteration or Processing Using Loops

Appropriate processing steps and iterations are clearly represented using a loop structure

More than one processing step or iteration is incomplete, lacks clarity, or is absent

Processing steps or iterations are absent or do not represent the proper steps to solve the problem

20

Readability and Convertibility

Pseudocode is clear and understandable and the code is organized

Pseudocode contains portions that are unclear, difficult to understand, or unorganized

Pseudocode is difficult to understand and is unorganized

20

Total:

100%

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How to Write Pseudocode

Pseudocode is an intermediary step between reading a problem statement and writing the code to solve the problem. It serves as a blueprint for your program in order to guide you through it, in much the same way that contractors start with a blueprint before building a house. Use it as a tool to begin thinking about your program, but keep in mind it might not be the final solution to the problem. Pseudocode is written in a natural language using some programming keywords. Consider this example:

INCREMENT the number of apples in the basket by one

Notice how the example fully describes, in natural language, what needs to be done in the program. When writing pseudocode, start at the beginning of what you need the program to do and then work through step by step until reaching the end of what is required by the program in the problem statement. This is putting the problem in sequence. For example, making a peanut butter sandwich could be written as follows:

OBTAIN a plate

OBTAIN two slices of bread

OBTAIN a jar of peanut butter

OBTAIN a knife

Place the slices of bread on the plate

Open the jar of peanut butter

Spread peanut butter on one bread slice with the knife

Place the empty slice of bread on top of the slice with peanut butter Serve

There are several common keywords that get capitalized because they refer to actions taken in the program. Those words include READ, WRITE, PRINT, DISPLAY, CALCULATE, SET, and INCREMENT. Choices and loops can be shown in pseudocode. When an item is nested inside another item, indent that line of pseudocode, just like coding. Below are three generic examples:

IF condition THEN

Include the first sequence

ELSE

Include the second sequence

ENDIF

WHILE condition

Include the sequence

ENDWHILE

FOR loop parameters

Include the sequence

ENDFOR

You can also use the keyword CALL to reference another algorithm written separately. Now look at a more complete example of both good and bad pseudocode to get a general feel of how to write it:

Bad Example—Vague and Incomplete function doProgrammingHomework():

Get things for homework

Write the code correctly

Finish the homework

Bad Example—Too Technical, Does Not Follow Natural Language Usage function doProgrammingHomework():

getComputer(); openLearningEnvironment();

for (var count = 0; count < problems.length(); count++)

solve(); while (!compile) debug(); submit()

shutDownComputer();

Good Example–Follows Steps One at a Time Through the End of the Algorithm function doProgrammingHomework():

GET a computer

OPEN the learning environment module

FOR each of the problems in the module Complete problem

WHILE the problem does not compile

Debug

ENDWHILE

Submit the assignment

ENDFOR

Shut down the computer

Remember not to make your pseudocode too technical. You are not trying to write the code itself, just a plan to be used as a stepping stone after the initial problem to get your creative juices flowing.